Thomas Newsome

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Publications

Google Scholar Profile

(Please email me at thomas.newsome@sydney.edu.au for copies of papers)

Books

1. Newsome TM, Newsome AE (2016) The red kangaroo in Central Australia: an early account by AE Newsome (CSIRO Publishing) (Whitley Award Winner – Royal Zoological Society of NSW).

Book Chapters

1. Dickman, C.R., Greenville A., Newsome, T.M. 2019. Carnivore conservation: the importance of carnivores to the ecosystem, and the value of reintroductions (book chapter in Saving the Tasmanian Devil)

Journal Articles

(** = first or senior author. Where applicable the following is noted: high online attention based AltMetric scores, journals with Impact Factors (IF) >4, papers with >100 citations, and journal accolades. Papers with >10 authors denoted with et al.)

2019 or In Press

 

61. Barton, B.T., Hill, J.G., Wolff C.L., Newsome, T.M., Ripple, W.J., Lashley M.A. In Press. Grasshopper consumption by grey wolves and implications for ecosystems. Ecology (IF: 5.17)

60. **Newsome, T.M., Wolf, C.H., Nimmo, D.G., Kopf, R.K. Ritchie, E.G., Smith, F.A., Ripple, W.J.  In Press. Constraints on vertebrate range size predict extinction risk. Global Ecology and Biogeography. (IF: 8).

59. Ripple, W.J., Wolf, C., Newsome, T.M., Barnard, P., Moomaw, W.R  In Press. Scientists’ warning on the climate emergency. BioScience. (IF: 5.4). (AltMetric >8000)

58. **Newsome, T.M., Howden, C., Wirsing, A. (2019). Restriction of anthropogenic foods alters a top predator’s diet and intra-specific interactions. Journal of Mammalogy 100, 1522-1532.

57. **van Eeden, L.M., Smith, B.P., Crowther, M.S., Dickman, C.R., Newsome, T.M., In Press. ‘The dingo menace’: an historic survey on graziers’ management of an Australian carnivore. Pacific Conservation Biology.

56. **van Eeden, L., Dickman, C., Crowther, M., Newsome, T., In Press. A snapshot of changes in graziers’ management and attitudes towards dingoes over 60 years. Pacific Conservation Biology.

55. Sweeney, O.F., Turnbull, J., Jones, M., Letnic, M., Newsome, T.M., Sharp, A., In Press. An Australian perspective on rewilding. Conservation Biology. (IF: 4.2).

54. van Eeden, L.M., Dickman, C.R., Newsome, T.M., Crowther, M.S., In Press. What should we do with wild dogs? Taxonomic tangles and the management of dingo-dog hybridisation. Australian Zoologist.

53. **Greenville, A.C., Wardle, G., Ritchie, E.G., Newsome T.M. 2019.  Demise of the dingo. Austral Ecology (Hot Topic) 44, 555-560.

52. Nimmo, D.G., Avitabile, S., Banks, S.C., Bliege Bird, R., Callister, K., Clarke, M.F., Dickman, C.R., Doherty, T.S., Driscoll, D.A., Greenville, A.C., Newsome, T.M. et al. 2019. Animal movements in fire‐prone landscapes. Biological Reviews 94, 981–998. (IF: 10.2).

51. van Eeden, L.M., Newsome, T.M., Crowther, M.S., Dickman, C.R., Bruskotter, J., 2019. Social identity shapes support for management of wildlife and pests. Biological Conservation 231, 167–173. (IF:4.6)

50. Smith, B.P., Cairns, K.M., Adams, J.W., Newsome, T.M., Fillios, M., Deaux, E.C., Parr, W.C., Letnic, M., Van Eeden, L.M., Appleby, R.G., 2019. Taxonomic status of the Australian dingo: the case for Canis dingo Meyer, 1793. Zootaxa 4564, 173–197.

49. Ripple, W.J., Wolf, C., Newsome, T.M., Betts, M.G., Ceballos, G., Courchamp, F., Hayward, M.W., Van Valkenburgh, B., Wallach, A.D., Worm, B., 2019. Are we eating the world’s megafauna to extinction? Conservation Letters e12627. (IF: 7.1) (AltMetric = 541).

48. Gabriele-Rivet, V., Arsenault, J., Wilhelm, B., Brookes, V.J., Newsome, T.M, Ward, M.P., 2019. A scoping review of dingo and wild-living dog ecology and biology in Australia to inform parameterisation for disease spread modelling. Frontiers in Veterinary Science 6, 47.

47. **Doherty, T.S., Davis, N.E., Dickman, C.R., Forsyth, D.M., Letnic, M., Nimmo, D.G., Palmer, R., Ritchie, E.G., Benshemesh, J., Edwards, G., Newsome T.M. 2019. Continental patterns in the diet of a top predator: Australia’s dingo. Mammal Review 49, 31–44. (IF:4.2) (AltMetric = 40).

2018

46. Wolf, C., Betts, M.G., Levi, T., Newsome, T.M., Ripple, W.J., 2018. Large species within carnivora are large carnivores. Royal Society Open Science 5, 181228.

45. van Eeden, L.M., Eklund, A., Miller, J.R., López-Bao, J.V., Chapron, G., Cejtin, M.R., Crowther, M.S., Dickman, C.R., Frank, J., Krofel, M., Newsome, T.M. et al. 2018. Carnivore conservation needs evidence-based livestock protection. PLoS Biology 16, e2005577. (IF:8.4).

44. **Van Eeden, L.M., Crowther, M.S., Dickman, C.R., Macdonald, D.W., Ripple, W.J., Ritchie, E.G., Newsome, T.M., 2018. Managing conflict between large carnivores and livestock. Conservation Biology 32, 26–34. (IF: 4.2) (AltMetric = 124).

43. Ripple, W.J., Wolf, C., Newsome, T.M., Hoffmann, M., Wirsing, A.J., McCauley, D.J., 2018. Reply to Pincheira-Donoso and Hodgson: Both the largest and smallest vertebrates have elevated extinction risk. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 115, E5847–E5848. (IF:9.5).

42. Ripple, W.J., Wolf, C., Galetti, M., Newsome, T.M., Green, T.L., Alamgir, M., Crist, E., Mahmoud, M.I., Laurance, W.F., 2018. The role of scientists’ warning in shifting policy from growth to conservation economy. BioScience 68, 239–240. (IF:5.4) (AltMetric = 81).

41. **Ripple, W.J., Meijaard, E., Newsome, T., 2018. Saving the World with Satire: A Response to Chapron et al. Trends in Ecology & Evolution 33, 483–484. (IF:15.9).

40. **Newsome, T.M, 2018. The Coevolution of Wolves and Humans. BioScience 68, 305– 306 (IF:5.4).

39. Driscoll, D.A., Bland, L.M., Bryan, B.A., Newsome, T.M., Nicholson, E., Ritchie, E.G., Doherty, T.S., 2018. A biodiversity-crisis hierarchy to evaluate and refine conservation indicators. Nature Ecology & Evolution 2, 775–781. (IF: Under Review) (AltMetric = 94).

38. dos Santos, C.L., Le Pendu, Y., Giné, G.A., Dickman, C.R., Newsome, T.M., Cassano, C.R., 2018. Human behaviors determine the direct and indirect impacts of free-ranging dogs on wildlife. Journal of Mammalogy 99, 1261–1269.

2017

37. **van Eeden, L.M., Dickman, C.R., Ritchie, E.G., Newsome, T.M., 2017. Shifting public values and what they mean for increasing democracy in wildlife management decisions. Biodiversity and Conservation 26, 2759–2763.

36. Spencer, E.E., Newsome, T.M., Dickman, C.R., 2017. Prey selection and dietary flexibility of three species of mammalian predator during an irruption of non-cyclic prey. Royal Society Open Science 4, 170317.

35. Ripple, W.J., Wolf, C., Newsome, T.M., Galetti, M., Alamgir, M., Crist, E., Mahmoud, M.I., Laurance, W.F., and 15, 364 scientist signatories from 184 countries, 2017. World scientists’ warning to humanity: a second notice. BioScience 67, 1026–1028. (IF:5.4) (AltMetric = 8528, highest score for 2017/2018) (292 Citations) (Featured in NY Times).

34. Ripple, W.J., Wolf, C., Newsome, T.M., Hoffmann, M., Wirsing, A.J., McCauley, D.J., 2017. Reply to Kalinkat et al.: Smallest terrestrial vertebrates are highly imperiled. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 114, E10265–E10265. (IF:10.4).

33. Ripple, W.J., Wolf, C., Newsome, T.M., Hoffmann, M., Wirsing, A.J., McCauley, D.J., 2017. Extinction risk is most acute for the world’s largest and smallest vertebrates. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 114, 10678–10683. (IF:10.4) (AltMetric = 555) (Featured in BBC and ABC 24).

32. Ripple, W.J., Chapron, G., López-Bao, J.V., Durant, S.M., Macdonald, D.W., Lindsey, P.A., Bennett, E.L., Beschta, R.L., Bruskotter, J.T., Campos-Arceiz, A., Newsome, T.M. et al. 2017. Conserving the world’s megafauna and biodiversity: The fierce urgency of now. BioScience 67, 197–200. (IF:5.4) (AltMetric = 99).

31. **Newsome, T.M, Van Eeden, L., 2017. Food waste is still an underappreciated threat to wildlife. Animal Conservation 20, 405–406. (Featured in BBC).

30. **Newsome, T.M, Spencer, E., Dickman, C., 2017. Short-term tracking of three red foxes in the Simpson Desert reveals large home-range sizes. Australian Mammalogy 39, 238–242.

29. **Newsome, T.M, van Eeden, L., 2017. The effects of food waste on wildlife and humans. Sustainability 9, 1269. (Featured in Mongabay).

28. **Newsome, T.M., Greenville, A.C., Letnic, M., Ritchie, E.G., Dickman, C.R., 2017. The case for a dingo reintroduction in Australia remains strong: a reply to Morgan et al., 2016. Food Webs 10, 39–41.

27. **Newsome, T.M., Greenville, A.C., Ćirović, D., Dickman, C.R., Johnson, C.N., Krofel, M., Letnic, M., Ripple, W.J., Ritchie, E.G., Stoyanov, S., 2017. Top predators constrain mesopredator distributions. Nature Communications 8, 15469. (IF:12) (AltMetric = 281).

26. **Newsome, T.M., Fleming, P.J., Dickman, C.R., Doherty, T.S., Ripple, W.J., Ritchie, E.G., Wirsing, A.J., 2017. Making a new dog? BioScience 67, 374–381. (IF:5.4) (AltMetric = 171) (Selected as Editor’s Choice for the issue) (Featured in Science and QuantaMagazine).

25. Molsher, R., Newsome, A.E., Newsome, T.M., Dickman, C.R., 2017. Mesopredator management: effects of red fox control on the abundance, diet and use of space by feral cats. PLoS One 12, e0168460.

24. Legge, S., Murphy, B., McGregor, H., Woinarski, J., Augusteyn, J., Ballard, G., Baseler, M., Buckmaster, T., Dickman, C., Doherty, T., Newsome, T.M. et al. 2017. Enumerating a continental-scale threat: how many feral cats are in Australia? Biological Conservation 206, 293–303. (IF:4.6) (Featured in TIME).

23. Lindenmayer D, Newsome TM et al. (2017) Save Australia’s ecological research. Science 357, 557. (IF:34) (Featured in Nature).

22. **Krofel, M., Giannatos, G., Ćirovič, D., Stoyanov, S., Newsome, T.M., 2017. Golden jackal expansion in Europe: a case of mesopredator release triggered by continent-wide wolf persecution? Hystrix: Italian journal of Mammalogy 28, 9–15.

21. Doherty, T.S., Dickman, C.R., Glen, A.S., Newsome, T.M., Nimmo, D.G., Ritchie, E.G., Vanak, A.T., Wirsing, A.J., 2017. The global impacts of domestic dogs on threatened vertebrates. Biological Conservation 210, 56–59. (IF:4.6).

2016

20. Ripple, W.J., Newsome, T.M., Kerley, G.I., 2016. Does trophy hunting support biodiversity? A response to Di Minin et al. Trends in Ecology & Evolution 31, 495–496.

19. Ripple, W.J., Chapron, G., López-Bao, J.V., Durant, S.M., Macdonald, D.W., Lindsey, P.A., Bennett, E.L., Beschta, R.L., Bruskotter, J.T., Campos-Arceiz, A., Newsome, T.M. et al. 2016. Saving the world’s terrestrial megafauna. BioScience 66, 807–812. (IF:5.4) (AltMetric = 1199).

18. Ripple, W.J., Abernethy, K., Betts, M.G., Chapron, G., Dirzo, R., Galetti, M., Levi, T., Lindsey, P.A., Macdonald, D.W., Machovina, B., Newsome, T.M. et al. 2016. Bushmeat hunting and extinction risk to the world’s mammals. Royal Society Open Science 3, 160498. (AltMetric = 562) (122 Citations) (Featured in Science).

17. **Newsome, T.M., Boitani, L., Chapron, G., Ciucci, P., Dickman, C.R., Dellinger, J.A., López‐Bao, J.V., Peterson, R.O., Shores, C.R., Wirsing, A.J., 2016. Food habits of the world’s grey wolves. Mammal Review 46, 255–269. (IF:4.2).

2015

16. Ripple, W.J., Newsome, T.M., Wolf, C., Dirzo, R., Everatt, K.T., Galetti, M., Hayward, M.W., Kerley, G.I., Levi, T., Lindsey, P.A., 2015. Collapse of the world’s largest herbivores. Science Advances 1, e1400103. (IF:12.8) (AltMetric = 607) (323 Citations) (Featured in TIME).

15. **Newsome, T., Ripple, W., 2015. Carnivore coexistence: trophic cascades. Science 347, 383–383. (IF:34).

14. **Newsome, T.M., Ripple, W.J., 2015. A continental scale trophic cascade from wolves through coyotes to foxes. Journal of Animal Ecology 84, 49–59. (IF:4.5) (AltMetric: 64).

13. **Newsome, T.M., Dellinger, J.A., Pavey, C.R., Ripple, W.J., Shores, C.R., Wirsing, A.J., Dickman, C.R., 2015. The ecological effects of providing resource subsidies to predators. Global Ecology and Biogeography 24, 1–11. (IF:8) (AltMetric: 115) (136 Citations).

12. **Newsome, T.M., Bruskotter, J.T., Ripple, W.J., 2015. When shooting a coyote kills a wolf: Mistaken identity or misguided management? Biodiversity and Conservation 24, 3145–3149.

11. **Newsome, T.M., Ballard, G., Crowther, M.S., Dellinger, J.A., Fleming, P.J., Glen, A.S., Greenville, A.C., Johnson, C.N., Letnic, M., Moseby, K.E., 2015. Resolving the value of the dingo in ecological restoration. Restoration Ecology 23, 201–208. (AltMetric: 131) (Featured in The Guardian).

10. **Dickman, C.R., Newsome, T.M., 2015. Individual hunting behaviour and prey specialisation in the house cat Felis catus: implications for conservation and management. Applied Animal Behaviour Science 173, 76–87.

2014

9. **Newsome, T.M., Crowther, M.S., Dickman, C.R., 2014. Rapid recolonisation by the European red fox: how effective are uncoordinated and isolated control programs? European Journal of Wildlife Research 60, 749–757.

8. **Newsome, T.M., Ballard, G.-A., Fleming, P.J., van de Ven, R., Story, G.L., Dickman, C.R., 2014. Human-resource subsidies alter the dietary preferences of a mammalian top predator. Oecologia 175, 139–150.

7. **Newsome, T.M., Ballard, G.-A., Crowther, M.S., Fleming, P.J., Dickman, C.R., 2014. Dietary niche overlap of free-roaming dingoes and domestic dogs: the role of human-provided food. Journal of Mammalogy 95, 392–403.

6. **Newsome, T.M., 2014. Makings of Icons: Alan Newsome, the Red Kangaroo and the Dingo. Historical Records of Australian Science 25, 153–171.

5. Johnson, C.N., Crowther, M.S., Dickman, C.R., Letnic, M.I., Newsome, T.M., Nimmo, D.G., Ritchie, E.G., Wallach, A.D., 2014. Experiments in no-impact control of dingoes: comment on Allen et al. 2013. Frontiers in Zoology 11, 17.

2013

4. **Newsome, T.M., Stephens, D., Ballard, G.-A., Dickman, C.R., Fleming, P.J., 2013. Genetic profile of dingoes (Canis lupus dingo) and free-roaming domestic dogs ( l. familiaris) in the Tanami Desert, Australia. Wildlife Research 40, 196–206.

3. **Newsome, T.M., Ballard, G., Dickman, C.R., Fleming, P.J., van de Ven, R., 2013. Home range, activity and sociality of a top predator, the dingo: a test of the Resource Dispersion Hypothesis. Ecography 36, 914–925. (IF:4).

2. **Newsome, T.M., Ballard, G.-A., Dickman, C.R., Fleming, P.J., Howden, C., 2013. Anthropogenic resource subsidies determine space use by Australian arid zone dingoes: an improved resource selection modelling approach. PLoS One 8, e63931.

1. Matthews, A., Ruykys, L., Ellis, B., FitzGibbon, S., Lunney, D., Crowther, M.S., Glen, A.S., Purcell, B., Moseby, K., Stott, J., Newsome, T.M. et al. 2013. The success of GPS collar deployments on mammals in Australia. Australian Mammalogy 35, 65–83.

___________________________________________

Published Dataset (first author papers only)

3. Newsome TM et al. (2017) Data from: Top predators constrain mesopredator distributions (Dryad Digital Repository)

2. Newsome TM, Ripple WJ (2014) Data from: A continental scale trophic cascade from wolves through coyotes to foxes (Dryad Digital Repository).

1. Newsome TM, Greenville AC, Ćirović D, Dickman CR, Johnson CN, Krofel M, Letnic M, Ripple WJ, Ritchie EG, Stoyanov S, Wirsing AJ (2017) Data from: Top predators constrain mesopredator distributions (Dryad Digital Repository)

___________________________________________

Conference Abstracts

25. Newsome TM (2018) Fear in a world dominated by introduced predators. The Wildlife Society Conference, Cleveland, USA

24. Newsome TM (2018) Humans and their role in shaping the ecological functions of wolves. International Wolf Symposium, Minneapolis, USA

23. Newsome TM (2018) Dingoes respond in unpredictable ways to a reduction in anthropogenic foods. Ecological Society of Australia Conference, Brisbane, Queensland

22. Newsome TM and Spencer EE (2018) Webs of death in the Anthropocene. Australasian Wildlife Management Society Conference, Hobart, Tasmania

21. Newsome TM (2018) Humans and their role in shaping the ecological functions of predators. Australian Mammal Society Conference, Brisbane, Queensland

20. Newsome TM (2017) Prey switching by dingoes in relation to a reduction in anthropogenic foods. Australasian Wildlife Management Society Conference, Blue Mountains, NSW

19. Newsome TM (2017) Using body size and range size to predict vertebrate extinction risk. Ecological Society of Australia Conference, Hunter Valley, NSW

18. Newsome TM (2016) Top predators can constrain mesopredator distributions. Australasian Wildlife Management Society Conference, Auckland, NZ

17. Newsome TM (2016) The predator edge hypothesis. Australian Mammal Society Conference, Alice Springs, NT

16. Newsome TM (2015) What can we learn from 90,000 wolf scats. Australasian Wildlife Management Society Conference, Perth, WA

15. Newsome TM (2015) What did the wolf eat? Understanding the diet of a globally distributed predator. Ecological Society of Australia Conference, Adelaide, SA

14. Newsome TM (2014) Hybridization and its influence on the great dingo debate. IBRI Wolf Conference, Grosseto, Italy (attended as a guest of the European Union)

13. Newsome TM and Ripple WJ (2014) Reconciling our differences with the dingo through the eyes of the wolf. Ecological Society of Australia Conference, Alice Springs, NT

12. Newsome TM and Ripple WJ (2014) Facilitating a trophic cascade from wolves through coyotes to foxes: how much wilderness is enough? Ecological Society of America Conference, Sacramento, CA

11. Newsome TM and Ripple WJ (2014) A wolf driven trophic cascade among carnivores across North America. Australian Mammal Society Conference, Melbourne, VIC

10. Newsome TM and Ripple WJ (2014) A continental scale trophic cascade from wolves through coyotes to foxes. Gordon Research Conference; Predator-Prey Interactions, Ventura, California, USA

9. Newsome TM and Ripple WJ (2013) Reintroducing wolves: a chance for dingoes too? International Wolf Symposium – Wolves and Humans at the Crossroads, Duluth, Minnesota, USA

8. Newsome TM, Fleming PJS, and Dickman CR (2013) Humans and their role as trophic regulators: a case study of the dingo in Australia. International Mammalogical Congress, Belfast, Ireland

7. Newsome TM, Ballard G, Crowther M, Fleming PJS, and Dickman CR (2013) Dietary overlap of free-roaming domestic dogs and dingoes: humans and their role as trophic regulators. Australian Mammal Society Conference, Sydney, NSW

6. Newsome TM, Ballard G, Fleming PJS, and Dickman CR (2011) When resources boom: learning from the story of dingoes in the Tanami Desert, Australia. Australian Mammal Society and American Society of Mammalogists, Portland, USA

5. Newsome TM, Ballard G, Fleming PJS, and Dickman CR (2010) When resources boom: learning from the story of dingoes in the Tanami Desert, Australia. Ecological Society of Australia Conference, Canberra, ACT

4. Newsome TM, Ballard G, Fleming PJS, and Dickman CR (2009) Diet of the dingo in the Tanami Desert. Australasian Wildlife Management Society Conference, Napier, NZ

3. Newsome TM, Ballard G, Fleming PJS, and Dickman CR (2008) Managing dingoes in the Tanami Desert. Australasian Wildlife Management Society Conference, Fremantle, WA

2. Newsome TM, Ballard G, Fleming PJS, and Dickman CR (2008) Activity of wild dogs, co-occurring carnivores and key prey species before and after annual strategic control in Northern NSW. Australasian Vertebrate Pest Conference, Darwin, NT

1. Newsome TM, Ballard G, Fleming PJS, and Dickman CR (2007) Activity of wild dogs, co-occurring carnivores and key prey species before and after annual strategic control in Northern NSW. Fenner Conference on the Environment, incorporating the  Australasian Wildlife Management Society Conference, Canberra, ACT


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